cosmetic MD

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SKIN AGEING

Who has not wished they could stop the march of time and stay young forever?

As we age, our skin cells begin to lose moisture and less collagen is produced in the dermis, which is responsible for the skin’s firmness. Elastin fibres begin to wear out, while our skin also thins as it loses fat in the subcutaneous layer. These changes altogether cause our skin to sag and wrinkle.

The main factors responsible for the ageing of our skin are exposure to sunlight and UV rays, poor diet, lack of exercise and cigarette smoking. The first signs of the ageing process begin to appear in our late 20s and accelerate with subsequent decades.

If we look at a comparison between young (youthful) skin and older (ageing) skin below, we can see as we get older that the skin thins, loses collagen (and tissue support) and blood supply and the outer lining (epidermis) becomes thinner and less efficient in retaining moisture.


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TAILORED PROGRAMS FOR AGEING SKIN

At cosmetic MD, we can tailor specific programs for individual patients to help them assist in maintaining the health of their skin and their appearance.

Let’s look at what happens to our skin as we get older and the most popular treatments available for each age group.



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In the 20s, it is important to start preventative measures to slow down the ageing process.

We can start with a good diet, regular exercise, avoid smoking and using a good moisturiser and sunscreen.

Fine lines may develop around the eyes and in the forehead. Acne breakouts may still be occurring.

Specific treatments may include:


In the 30s, we can now see visible changes in the skin. Fine lines and wrinkles may be present in the forehead, frown and crows feet. Past UV exposure may start causing sun spots (solar lentigo). Pregnancy or the contraceptive pill may cause pigmentation to occur and persist in the skin (melasma). For the lucky ones with darker skin, the melanin protects the skin from some facets of the ageing process - the fine lines and pigment changes in fairer skin may be delayed for 10 years or more

Maintaining a good diet, regular exercise, avoiding smoking and using a good moisturiser and sunscreen are still important.

Specific treatments may include:

In the 40s, visible changes of moderate wrinkling, sagging and skin laxity are present in the face, neck and chest (and also the arms and hands). More pigmentation is present. Changes in facial volume are present in areas such as the cheeks, tear troughs, and around the mouth. we can now see visible changes in the skin. Fine lines and wrinkles may be present in the forehead, frown and crows feet.

Maintaining a good diet, regular exercise, avoiding smoking and using a good moisturiser and sunscreen are still important.

Specific treatments may include:

In the 50s and over, we see continuing degradation in the condition, texture and complexion of the skin and facial volume. Moderate to severe wrinkling, sagging and skin laxity, and pigment changes are present in the face, neck, chest and elsewhere. Facial volume continues to decrease. The onset of menopause and withdrawal of hormonal support of the skin means drier, thinner and less robust skin.

Accumulated sun exposure and fairer skin are accompanied by the development of skin cancers - having regular skin checks at your local skin cancer clinic is important.

Maintaining a good diet, regular exercise, avoiding smoking and using a good moisturiser and sunscreen are still important.

Specific treatments may include:




To find out more about these procedures, please visit our dedicated pages on the website, go to our Contact page to send cosmetic MD an email or call us to organise a consultation.