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LASER FUNGAL NAIL TREATMENT (Onychomycosis)

What causes fungal nail infections?

Fungal nail infections are usually caused by damage made to your nail allowing the fungus to invade the nail. If your feet are stuck inside shoes all day, this provides the perfect habitat of warmth and dampness that allow the fungus to thrive. Other factors can also include nail biting, foot trauma, smoking and diabetes.

Note that not all types of fungal infections can be effectively treated with laser. Studies demonstrate that laser treatment is most successful for Trichophyton species. If you have a suspected fungal nail infection, your GP or podiatrist can send specimens of your nail(s) for identification of the particular fungus.

How does the laser treatment work?

The laser is applied to the whole of your affected nail. The laser energy gently heats up your nail evenly throughout its depth which weakens the fungus and kills it off. For susceptible fungi, laser treatment provides complete fungal elimination without the use of any harsh chemicals.

How many treatments will I need?

From our experience, you will see your nail appearance improve in a matter of months.

The fungus free nail will start to grow gradually replacing your infected nail within 12-18 months.

The price of treatment includes 4 sessions that for best results we recommend you have them spaced 1 week apart. Rarely a second course of treatments may be required to completely eliminate the fungus.

Does the laser treatment hurt?

The majority of clients do not experience any high levels of discomfort during the treatment. We can use Cryo skin cooling to aid with any discomfort you may have.

Who cannot have laser nail treatment?

Patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy where they lose the sensation in their feet are NOT good candidates for laser onychomycosis treatment.

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LASER ONYCHOMYCOSIS TREATMENT EXPLAINED (courtesy San Francisco Podiatry)